Electrical safety

  1. Safe Isolation: Staying A.L.I.V.E

    It has been sixteen years since Michael Adamson, an experienced 26-year-old electrician, tragically died after cutting a cable marked “NOT IN USE”. The cable had been wired into a distribution board and was not safely isolated; Michael suffered a fatal electric shock. Over the years, leading bodies, such as the Electrical Safety Roundtable, have worked to develop procedures and protocols designed to prevent injuries and fatalities caused by a lack of safe isolation. Now, Martindale has developed an easy-to-follow and memorable safe isolation process: A.L.I.V.E.[1] Continue reading →
  2. What Are CAT Ratings?

    On the right of the image a DiLog CombiVolt Tester is being proved using a DiLog PU690 Proving Unit. The proving unit is hanging on the wall in a black fabric case with a clear, plastic window through which the PU690 can be seen and accessed. On the left of the image it reads 'What Are CAT Ratings?' in white and yellow block lettering. In summary, CAT ratings are overvoltage categories; they are safety ratings that indicate the types of electrical environments in which test and measurement instruments can be safely used. Understanding these categories is crucial to ensuring that you select the correct tool when working on an electrical installation.[1] Continue reading →
  3. Keeping Abreast of the Wiring Regulations 3rd Amendment

    The 5th January 2015 publication of the latest version of BS7671 will introduce the 3rd Amendment to the 17th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations. The enforcement of the content within the latest edition of the Wiring Regulations will be required from July 2015, with new regulations for the design, installation and commissioning of electrical installations, plus inspection and testing. It is important for electricians to get up to speed with Amendment 3 and its changes, advises Carole Jameson, Training Centre Administration Manager at PASS Electrical Training. Continue reading →
  4. Angle Grinder Mishap with Electrical Cable Flings Worker across Basement

    A Liverpool worker is ‘lucky to be alive’ after cutting through a live mains cable, having been told been told the electricity supply had been disconnected, Liverpool Magistrates’ Court heard last week. Continue reading →
  5. Mind That Electric Gate

    Electric gates must be adequately guarded to avoid injury or death and yesterday a Leicester contractor pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 18 of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 after a child’s head was trapped in electric gate, and was fined £4,000 with costs. Continue reading →
  6. Minister Unveils New Part P Register

    Last week at an event in the Houses of Parliament, the Minister for Communities and Local Government, Stephen Williams MP, officially unveiled the new mark and register for all domestic Part P registered electrical installers. The new website and logo was developed by all Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG) authorised electrical Competent Person Scheme Operators in a bid to create a single point of reference for consumers seeking a registered electrical contractor. Continue reading →
  7. Worker in 2-Week Coma following Burns in 415V Electrical Explosion

    A North London labourer received life-threatening burn injuries in an explosion when he severed a 415V electrical cable, unaware it was still live, a court has heard. Continue reading →
  8. ECA Seeks Clarifications for Amendment 3 of Wiring Regulations

    PASS Ltd, the independent test equipment expert, is backing calls by the Electrical Contractors' Association for clarification on issues raised by the publication of the 17th Edition Wiring Regulations. Continue reading →
  9. Electrical Safety First pushes for Five-Yearly Safety Checks

    Electrical Safety First is asking stakeholders to support its position on the Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG) Review of Property Conditions in the Private Rented Sector (PRS). Continue reading →
  10. New BS Voltage Tester Standard bans Fuses

    The British Standard relating to two-pole voltage indicators, BS EN61243-3 was revised in 2010 and came into force in May 2013. Now all voltage indicators on the British and European markets should comply with the latest version of the standard, which precludes the use of a fuse. Continue reading →
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